Top Books of 2021

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Top Books of 2021
18 Dec 2021
6 min read

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As the calendar is about to turn the page to a new year, we have got something for you! A list of top books of 2021 that are a must-read! #ThinkWithNiche

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Books are rare! They are more like our best buddies, which give us the much-needed feeling of comfort. If you haven't ended this year reading the top books of 2021, then what have you read? It is the perfect time to explore new books and authors. From fiction to historical events, these books have set stirring records. Here is the list of top books of 2021 you must grab before they fly out of the shelves.

No One Is Talking About This

Lockwood sprang to prominence as a writer on the Intertubes, producing brilliantly imaginative and coarse context — virtuoso, inappropriate texts. She described posting on Twitter as "an artistic medium, like sculpting a model or blaring the patriotic song beneath your underarms " in her 2017 book "Priestdaddy," describing coming of age in thatched cottages around the West overseen by mostly her assault rifle, acoustic enthusiast dad, a Church pastor. She distills the thrills and setbacks of existence divided among digital and face-to-face relationships in her debut novel, transforming the discord becomes artistry. The outcome is a pithy quote that itself is majestic, irreverent, private, intellectual, humorous, and ultimately very affecting.

On Juneteenth

This masterpiece combines historical events and narrative into a concise collection that is intelligent, moving, and brave. Gordon-Reed urges audiences to view the bigger picture following the present screaming conversations and chance a rather more comprehensive analysis of historical events as well as the shocks it may bring, as she explores the ethnic and economic intricacies of Houston, her tiny hometown. Since she was the first child of color to merge her Texan school, she had a unique viewpoint. She was rejected by racial groups on multiple instances, discovering young, that crossing the color bracket may be dangerous towards the duo groups. 

The Copenhagen Trilogy

Ditlevsen's beautiful recollections, which were initially released in Copenhagen in the late 60s and early 70s and have been already gathered in one edition, reveal her downtrodden origins, professional trajectory, and harsh substance dependence: a poignant story of the battle to integrate creativity and reality. She began her career at fourteen, rose to fame as a poetry muse in her mid-twenties, and in her mid-thirties, she was married to a doctor and chronically addicted to opiates following 2 unsuccessful nuptials. Despite catastrophic turns, those volumes collectively reflect a striking lucidity, wit, and candor, throwing illumination not only on the globe's terrible facts but also on everyone's hidden soul's unfathomable desires. 

How Beautiful We Were

Mbue's wide-ranging and discreetly catastrophic 2nd novel opens in 1980 in the mythical Isolated community of Kurosawa, in which delegates from powerful U.S. petroleum industry have agreed to visit with the villagers, whose lives are lost as a consequence of natural mayhem (unplanted pastures, polluted oceans) destruction wrought by its digging and transmission lines. This multi-decade parable of gangsterism proves to be far less straightforward than the typical narrative of a ruthless organization and the people it destroys. Mbue crafts a complex investigation of identity, about what it signifies to desire in the era of neoliberalism and imperialism — those engines of vicious, ravenous seeking — via the perspective of Kosawa's residents, big and small.